Searches for very rare decays of the Higgs boson by the ATLAS experiment

ATLAS event display showing a candidate event of the Higgs boson decaying into two muons

The Particle Physics Research Centre at QMUL have been searching for the very rare decay of the Higgs boson into two muons harvesting the data collected by the ATLAS experiment at CERN. Only one in every 5000 Higgs bosons decays in this specific way and the ATLAS team at QMUL lead by Antony Fray and Eram Rizvi have been studying this elusive decay in the last year. This study is crucial to establish the properties of the Higgs boson and how it interacts with the rest of the fundamental particles. The analysis has been now published by the prestigious journal series Physics Review Letters and it has been highlighted as Editor's Choice by the journal itself.

The Hyper-Kamiokande Project is in the MEXT Large Projects Roadmap

Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K), a third-generation Water Cherenkov detector and the latest in an illustrious series of world-leading experiments located in Japan, is being developed by an international collaboration. It will take advantage of its predecessors:  the double Nobel prize winning experiment (Super-)Kamiokande and the extremely succesful K2K (1999-2004) and T2K (2010-) long baseline neutrino experiments. T2K just rejected the hypothesis that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate with the same probability at 95%.

T2K presents hint of CP violation by neutrinos

The international T2K Collaboration, where Queen Mary group plays significant roles, strengthened its previous hint that the symmetry between matter and antimatter may be violated for neutrino oscillation.  A preliminary analysis of T2K’s latest data rejects the hypothesis that neutrinos and antineutrinos oscillate with the same probability at 95% confidence (2σ) level. With nearly twice the neutrino data in 2017 compared to their 2016 results, T2K has performed a new analysis of neutrino and antineutrino data using a new event reconstruction algorithm for interactions in the far detector, Super-Kamiokande. http://t2k-experiment.org/2017/08/t2k-2017-cpv/

PsiStar students in visit at CERN

QMUL PsiStar students in visit at CERN

On Monday February 20, a delegation of PsiStar students have visited CERN and its facilities. They visited the first synchrocyclotron built at CERN in 1954 and then they went underground to visit the cathedral-size CMS and ATLAS experiments, taking data at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

New Earth-like planet found around nearest star

Clear evidence of a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to the Solar System, has been found by an international team of scientists led by astronomers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL).

Using facilities operated by ESO (the European Southern Observatory) and other telescopes, the research, which is published in the journal Nature, reveals a world with a similar mass to Earth orbiting around Proxima Centauri.

The planet, called Proxima b, orbits its parent star every 11 days and has a temperature suitable for liquid water to exist on its surface. This rocky world is a little more massive than the Earth, and is the closest planet outside our Solar System. Planets around other stars are commonly referred to as exoplanets.

Celebrate the International Women Day with SPA

SPA and the Juno Committee is celebrating the International Women's Day with a special lecture on women and physics in the developing world. Join us on Wednesday 9th March at 13:30 in the G.O.Jones Lecture Theater. Dr Kate Shaw is a particle physics researcher working in the ATLAS experiment at the CERN collider. She is also passionate ambassador of physics research in developing countries.

Kate will tell us about her work in the middle and far East. She will illustrate and discuss her experience focusing on the participation of women. Discussion will follow about women and physics in academia and UK.

See event agenda here: https://indico.ph.qmul.ac.uk/indico/conferenceDisplay.py?confId=87

Half-Life: A mysterious tale of neutrinos and spies

Frank Close, acclaimed author of several books explaining physics to the general audience, will come to the School of Physics and Astronomy at QMUL on Friday March 4th at 4:15pm in the G.O.Jones Lecture Theatre. He will talk about his latest book telling the story of physicist Bruno Pontecorvo.

T2K collaboration awarded the prestigious Breakthrough Prize for Fundamental Physics

Dr Koichiro Nishikawa and the members of the T2K collaboration have been awarded the prestigious Breakthrough Prize for Fundamental Physics, for their role in the discovery and study of neutrino oscillation. 
 
The prize, presented by the Breakthrough Prize Foundation, was awarded “for the fundamental discovery of neutrino oscillations, revealing a new frontier beyond, and possibly far beyond, the standard model of particle physics”. The prize is valued at 3 million USD, and is shared with four other international experimental collaborations studying neutrino oscillation: The Daya Bay, KamLAND, SNO, and Super-Kamiokande scientific collaborations.  The T2K collaboration is named together with the K2K collaboration for its share of the prize.  Dr. Nishikawa is the founding spokesperson of the T2K and K2K collaborations.

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